Welsh Corgi, Cardigan

Overview

Originating in Wales, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is similar to the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. However, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is considered to be the older of the two varieties. Bred to drive cattle, guard the farm, and hunt vermin, this breed was also an integral part of the family. This breed is relatively rare but is continuously and consistently gaining public recognition.

Character

A small yet hardy breed, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi has a fox-like face and is long and low in build. They are extremely versatile in both thought and action. They possess strength, endurance, and speed. A handsome and powerful breed, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is also dependable, trustworthy, loyal, and affectionate.

Temperament

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi has an endearing and delightful personality. This breed is highly intelligent, sensible, alert, and courageous. They thrive on human companionship and are deeply devoted to their family. They are wary of strangers and will guard and protect their family and territory. This breed is best suited for a family with older considerate children. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi gets along well with non-canine pets and with other Corgis, but has a tendency to be aggressive with other dogs. Caution, care, and control must be used with this breed to keep them safe from harm when they are in defense mode. As members of the herding group they will attempt to perform this task with everyone and anything that moves.

Care

This breed requires minimal grooming. They should be brushed with a firm bristle brush on a regular basis. During their heavy shedding period they should be brushed and combed daily. Bathing should only be done when absolutely necessary using a mild shampoo. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is prone to such health problems as progressive retinal atrophy, glaucoma, cataracts, and back problems.

Coat

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a double coat breed. The outer coat is harsh, straight, water resistant, and of medium length. The under coat is dense and soft in texture. The hair is more profuse around the neck, the underside of the tail, and the backs of the legs. The coat comes in a variety of colors such as sable, red, brindle, black, blue merle, black and tan, and black and brindle. The coat also has white markings. The Cardigan is a constant shedder with heavy bi-annual shedding.

Training

Eager to please and very obedient, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi benefits from early socialization and basic obedience training. The crate training method is recommended for housetraining this breed. They excel in agility, herding trials, tracking, conformation, obedience, and love to learn and perform tricks. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is also used extensively as a therapy dog and in search and rescue.

Activity

This breed requires daily exercise such as a securely leashed walk, family play session, or a romp and run in a fenced yard. They are moderately active indoors. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi will do well in an apartment or condominium dwelling provided they are given sufficient exercise, companionship, and stimulation.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100269/

Weimardoodle

Overview

The Weimardoodle is created by the crossing of two breeds: Weimaraner and Poodle. They are commonly referred to as “designer dogs”. They are not as popular as many of the other crosses.

Character

The ideal Weimardoodle is muscular, athletic, and hardy. They possess a well-built appearance and intelligent expression.

Temperament

Affectionate, happy, and loving, the Weimardoodle is cheerful and pleasant. They are also brave and sensitive. They are not recommended for homes with small children due to their large size. Weimardoodle’s do well with dogs they have been raised with but are not recommended for homes with non-canine pets. They are very family oriented and do not do well if ignored or left alone for extended periods of time. Boredom and loneliness will lead to destructive behavior. The Weimardoodle is wary of strangers and will quickly alert their family to visitors or out of the ordinary sounds.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100307/

Boykin Spaniel

Overview

A relatively modern breed, the Boykin Spaniel breed is highly regarded for their hunting abilities of water fowl. Originating in the Southern United States, the Boykin Spaniel is designated as the official dog of South Carolina.

Character

The Boykin Spaniel is sturdy, of medium size, and well-built. This breed possesses agility, speed, and endurance. Boykin Spaniel’s are capable of covering any type of terrain in any weather, and are excellent swimmers. They are skilled both in field and water retrieving.

Temperament

The Boykin Spaniel is amicable, loyal, devoted, and docile. The Boykin Spaniel is an enthusiastic hunter, pleasant companion, and willing worker. They thrive on human contact and get along exceptionally well with children and other pets.
Care
The Boykin Spaniel requires regular brushing to prevent matting. Bathing should be done when necessary. It is important to regularly check the ears for debris or infection. The Boykin Spaniel breed is prone to such health issues as eye problems, hip dysplasia, skin and heart problems.

Coat

The Boykin Spaniel coat is of short to medium length, is straight to moderately wavy, and fine in texture. There is light feathering on the ears, legs, feet, chest, and underside.

Training

Boykin Spaniel’s excel in structured agility and obedience classes. The Boykin Spaniel possesses a softer temperament than other Spaniel breeds so does not respond to harsh or heavy-handed methods. They do quite well with motivational training. They require fairness and consistency.

Activity

The Boykin Spaniel is not recommended for apartment living. They require daily exercise and mental stimulation or they will become bored and destructive. This breed is exceedingly driven and energetic and do best in a rural setting. They thrive on hunting, swimming, and family activity.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100051/

Norwegian Lundehund – the rarest dog breed

On first sight the Norwegian Lundehund breed dogs do not look different than the other breeds. They have four legs, a tail, four paws and… six fingers – yes, that’s right six fingers on each paw. The extra fingers are the first indication that the Lundehunds are not like the other dogs. This is the rarest dog breed in the world and the lest known. The breed comes from Norway and these dogs are specified in sea birds hunting, where the name comes from.
Its name is composed of the prefix Lunde, from the Norwegian lundefugl (puffin), and the suffix hund, meaning dog. The Norwegian Lundehund breed is hunting puffins living on coastal cliffs or offshore islands nearby Norway. There are only 1500 dogs of this breed in the world. In the Second World War there were only 6 dogs alive, because of diseases.

The six fingers are not the only unusual feature of this breed. They are also very flexible. Dogs of this breed are able to bend their head backwards along their own spine and turn their forelegs to the side at a 90-degree horizontal angle to their body, much like human arms. The sixth finger helps the
Norwegian Lundehund in hunting on the slippery cliffs. They do not use it while being upright. Their pricked, upright ears can be folded shut to form a near-tight seal by folding forward or backward, helping them when winding or raining.

Nowadays the dog breeders try to recover the number of the breed. A major problem is that between two and four puppies are being born at a time.
The breed has genetic problems leading the dogs to have no appetite , not being able to absorb the nutrients from the food. There is no cure for this problem and they need a special diet.

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Tibetan Mastiff

Overview

The Tibetan Mastiff is independent, protective, and very loyal making him a great guard dog. This breed can become bored fairly easily so he should have lots of attention and stimulation so he does not become destructive.

Character

The Tibetan Mastiff is strong willed and very intelligent, and is good for many different functions, however this breed does require proper training to do so. With the right training, he can do well in obedience, agility, and will do well as a guardian.

Temperament

The Tibetan Mastiff is not for everyone, but is very affectionate, loving, and loyal. An intelligent breed, he can also be very stubborn and has a short attention span so proper handling is a must.

Care

The Tibetan Mastiff has very little dog odor, but does blow his undercoat once a year making grooming a chore. Regular brushing should be performed during this stage. Weekly brushing otherwise should be sufficient.

Coat

The Tibetan Mastiff is double coated, with long and thick guard hair that should be coarse to the touch. The undercoat should be soft and heavy making him resistant to cold weather, however the undercoat will be sparser in warmer climates.

Training

A dominant and strong handler is a must for this strong willed breed. He can become very destructive without the proper training or stimulation. Consistency and variety is key to keep his attention. With this, the Tibetan Mastiff will thrive.

Activity

Tibetan Mastiffs should always have regular exercise, but it should be regulated as too much can cause problems with the joints due to his size. Regular walks should be sufficient, but he should have at least a medium sized yard.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100261/

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Pharaoh Hound

Overview

The Pharaoh Hound is naturally intelligent, well behaved, and very pleasant. Blushing is an endearing quality of this breed. Blushing when excited will steal your heart. Not recommended for a home with non-canine pets as this breed likes to chase things and is a hunter.

Character

Cheerful, quiet, and independent, this breed is wonderful with children making him a good household pet for any child to grow up with. Can be wary of strangers, but will warm up quickly. The Pharaoh Hound is prone to timidity and should be well socialized as an early stage of life.

Temperament

Doing well in running and obedience sports, the Pharaoh Hound should always be a companion animal. Not good for kennel life, this dog loves to be near his owner. This dog can be active yet calm and collected at times making this dog perfect for a household with children, although they should be properly trained with this breed.

Care

Rubber brushing for the Pharaoh Hound is fine for removing loose and dead hair. An average shedding breed, this dog does not need regular bathing, only when necessary. A very clean and well kempt dog, grooming is not a big concern.

Coat

This beautiful and athletic breed has a short coat that doesn’t need much grooming. The coat is short and glossy lying close to the body of the dog. The Pharaoh Hound is weather resistant to a degree.

Training

Training should always be consistent and gentle as this breed can be very sensitive to a harsh voice. Prone to timidity, the trainer must be well experienced with this breed so they’re not to frighten him. The Pharaoh Hound is rather intelligent and can do well in obedience.

Activity

The Pharaoh Hound if left outdoors for a long period should be protected from the cold. Does best in warmer climates, but if protected will also do well in cooler weather. A strong instinct to hunt, this breed must have a tall fence as they can easily climb or jump to find wild game.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100200/

 

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Wolf Hybrid

Overview

Before purchasing a Wolf Hybrid it is extremely important to check State and Local laws. The Wolf Hybrid is typically referred to as “WolfDog”. They are a cross of an Arctic Wolf with a large dog breed.

Character

The Wolf Hybrid is generally well-proportioned and very large. They possess long limbs, are agile, and muscular. The face has the appearance of a Wolf with a long, tapering muzzle.

Temperament

The Wolf Hybrid is not recommended for inexperienced or timid owners. They are loyal, devoted, and family oriented. As a “pack” animal they do well with large sized dogs they have been raised with. They are not recommended for homes with small dogs, cats or other household pets. Wolf Hybrid’s are suspicious of strangers and will protect their family, property, and territory. The Wolf Hybrid is not recommended for homes with children.

Care

Regular brushing is recommended of the Wolf Hybrid. Dry-shampooing will suffice. They may be prone to hip dysplasia.

Coat

The coat of the Wolf Hybrid is dependent upon the breed of dog breed used. However, the Wolf has a double coat that is extremely dense.

Training

Early, intense, and ongoing socialization and obedience is crucial. The Wolf Hybrid will not respond to harsh or heavy-handed methods. Training must be done with respect, firmness, fairness, and consistency.

Activity

The Wolf Hybrid possesses high endurance and great energy. They are not recommended for apartment or city living. Wolf Hybrid’s do best in a securely fenced rural setting with ample room to roam and run.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100366/

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English Coonhound

Overview

The English Coonhound breed descends from Irish and French breeds brought to America. They were utilized to hunt fox by day and raccoon by night. The original Coonhounds were inadequate when hunting by American standards due to their inability to track quarry in trees. Therefore, the original breed was crossed with the Bloodhound to enhance their scent tracking ability. Today English Coonhound’s are used to track and hunt raccoon, oppossum, cougar, deer, boar, and bear.

Character

The English Coonhound is often described as a well-conditioned athlete. They move effortlessly and possess great endurance, vigor, and strength. This breed is capable of tremendous speed, is versatile, and highly competitive.

Temperament

Affectionate, assured, watchful, fearless, and loyal. The English Coonhound breed does best in packs rather than being the only dog. They get along with older, considerate children and other pets they have been raised with. The English Coonhound has a tendency to be high-strung, exuberant, and lively.

Care

Regular brushing with a firm bristle brush is recommended. Bathing should only be done when absolutely necessary. It is important to regularly check the ears and paw pads for debris. English Coonhound’s are prone to Hip Dysplasia.

Coat

The coat of the English Coonhound is stiff, harsh, and short.

Training

The English Coonhound requires early socialization. They do not respond to harsh or heavy-handed methods. Training must be done with firmness, fairness, patience, and consistency. The English Coonhound breed excels in performance, conformation, and field trial events.

Activity

A highly energetic breed, the English Coonhound is not recommended for city or apartment dwelling. They do best in a rural setting with an active owner. If they are excessively confined or become bored they will bay consistently and become destructive.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100101/

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Weimaraner

Overview

The Weimaraner is a centuries old breed from Germany. They are pointers and retrievers that possess many talents. The Weimaraner is utilized in various capacities such as police work, search and rescue, and tracking. This breed is athletic and moderately large.

Character

The Weimaraner is a versatile breed that has both the intellect and energy to accomplish almost anything. They are friendly, alert, and willing to please. The Weimaraner is muscular yet graceful in motion. They are generally gentle and protective companions.

Temperament

The Weimaraner is happy and cheerful, highly intelligent and loving. They can be very willful and opinionated. This breed exhibits a truly unique personality. They are passionate and reliable. The Weimaraner prefers to live inside as a member of the family. They require companionship and attention and do not like to be left alone for long periods of time. This breed gets along well with other dogs but not cats. They are not recommended for very young children or the elderly as they could easily knock them down. The Weimaraner is brave and loyal.

Care

The Weimaraner’s smooth, short coat is easy to care for. Brushing should be done with a firm bristle brush. They should only be bathed when absolutely necessary. They do well with occasional dry shampooing. They should have their feet and mouth inspected for damage after exercise or work sessions. The Weimaraner is prone to bloating, so small meals two times a day are best. They may suffer from hip dysplasia but are generally healthy.

Coat

The Weimaraner has a fine, short, sleek gray coat. The color ranges from a mouse gray to a silver gray. The distinctive color led to this breed being nicknamed the Silver Ghost or Gray Ghost. The Weimaraner’s coat color is a rarity among dog breeds.

Training

The Weimaraner is full of energy. They are eager to learn and please and are motivated by rewards such as treats or praise. This breed does not respond to harsh discipline and once mistrustful will avoid any and all further attempts of training. The Weimaraner excels at obedience, agility, hunting and showing.

Activity

The Weimaraner requires strenuous exercise and stimulation. They love to play ball, romp, hike, and hunt. They must have room to roam and be given many opportunities to release their energy. Therefore, a large yard is preferred and is best for them. They do not kennel well and are not a breed for owners who lead sedentary lifestyles. The Weimaraner must be given sufficient exercise to prevent them from becoming bored, barking excessively, or being destructive.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/dogs/Weimaraner/

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Vizsla

Overview

The Vizsla is classified as a rare breed. They originated in Hungary in the 8th century as a hunting dog, although owning this breed was a symbol of aristocracy. They were nearly extinct after WWII. The Vizsla was revived by the Hungarians who smuggled their beloved breed out of the country for fear of them being desecrated.

Character

The Vizsla is a versatile gun dog that is able to work in the forest, field, and water. They excel in retrieving, and are capable of covering difficult terrain in extreme weather conditions. The Vizsla has an easygoing nature and is an excellent companion.

Temperament

The Vizsla is friendly, lively, and affectionate with their family and those they know. They are alert and watchful. They will bark when they sense danger or visitors. They are very reserved with strangers. The Vizsla is very demonstrative, but has a tendency to be willful and distracted. They get along well with older children and in most cases other dogs. They will tolerate cats they are raised with. The Vizsla loves to chew on anything and everything and is not a calm and placid breed. They will become destructive if they are allowed to be bored.

Care

The Vizsla’s coat requires very minimal care. They need to be brushed occasionally with a firm bristle brush and dry shampooed when necessary. Bathing should only be done with a mild soap so as not to strip the coat the protective oils. It is important to keep their nails trimmed. The Vizsla is generally healthy, but has a tendency toward hemophilia and hip dysplasia. They do not tolerate cold climates.

Coat

The Vizsla breed comes in two coat varieties: the Smooth and Wire. The Smooth is short, dense, close to the body, and shiny. There is no undercoat. The Wire is hard, harsh, and loose fitting. There is no gloss or shine. There is a winter under-coat and the hair is brush-like on the back of the forelegs, head, muzzle, and ears. The Vizsla coat colors range from golden to russet. They are average shedders.

Training

The Vizsla needs both socialization and obedience training at an early age. Owners of this breed must make their authority clear right from the start. They are eager to please and quick to learn. The Vizsla displays their talents in the areas of tracking, pointing, retrieving, and competitive obedience. Harsh methods of training will ruin this breed. They need firm, fair, and consistent training.

Activity

The Vizsla is an extremely active breed that requires strenuous activity daily. They thrive in a large fenced area or a leashed jog with their owner. They also require mental stimulation, such as play sessions with their family to ensure their happiness. They are not recommended for apartment dwelling due to their enormous stamina.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100267/

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Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Overview

Originating in England, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier was bred for bull, bear, and lion baiting. The aforementioned “blood-sports” were officially eliminated in 1835 when Britain introduced animal welfare laws. However, “blood-sport” proponents began using this breed for organized dog fighting. Today, with their “blood-sport” history behind them, this breed has become a stable and popular family pet.

Character

Often referred to as the Staffie, this muscular and stocky breed exudes strength, courage, and athletic ability. They are bold, tenacious, and alert. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier has a fearless, protective, and determined nature and is extremely agile. Their most distinguishing and striking features are their broad head and expressive face.

Temperament

Despite this breed’s beginnings, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier is renowned today for their reliability as a companion and family pet. They thrive on human contact and are extremely loving, devoted, and loyal. This breed is dependable gentle and reliable with children, and for this reason were nicknamed the Nanny Dog. They are exceedingly protective of their family and make excellent guardians and watchdogs. They are not suited for homes with other dogs or household pets they have not been raised with. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is not recommended for the novice dog owner.

Care

This breed requires minimal grooming. An occasional firm, bristle brushing and bath will suffice. They do not tolerate cold climates but also have a tendency to become over-heated quickly. They are best suited as indoor pets. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is prone to cataracts, hip dysplasia, luxating patella, and epilepsy. They are also very susceptible to fleas and ticks.

Coat

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier has a soft, sleek, dense, and short coat that lays close to the body. The color of the coat may be blue, brindle, black, red, or fawn. There may or may not be white markings. This breed is an average shedder.

Training

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier requires a dominant owner and needs early and intense socialization and obedience training. They are easily housetrained. It is absolutely crucial that all training of this breed be done in a positive, consistent, patient, and firm manner. They excel in agility and obedience competition and have had success as therapy dogs.

Activity

Due to their athletic nature, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier needs vigorous daily exercise. It is imperative that they be securely leashed or harnessed in all public outings such as walking, jogging, or hiking. They benefit from off-lead run time in a securely fenced yard and greatly enjoy play sessions with their family. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier will do okay in an apartment dwelling provided they are given sufficient exercise, companionship, and stimulation.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100257/

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Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Overview

Originating in Ireland, this breed was used as an all-purpose farmers’ dog. They were vermin killers, guard dogs, herders of sheep and cattle, hunters on land and in water, and a deterrent to trespassers. By 1932 this breed had nearly vanished, but were saved from becoming extinct by dog fancier Patrick Blake. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is highly intelligent and extremely versatile. They are steadily gaining in popularity in the United States.

Character

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is medium-sized, compact, agile, and powerful. They possess stamina, gameness, strength, and gaiety. This breed is more steady and stable than most terriers. They have not been overly refined and retain the many fine attributes they were originally developed with.

Temperament

A happy, well-balanced and friendly terrier, the Wheaten possesses grace and pride. They are self-confident, easy-going, and deeply devoted to their family. They get along well with older children and with dogs they have been raised with. This breed is not suitable for homes with cats or other small household pets. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier requires a great deal of effort and commitment and is not recommended for novice dog owners. This breed rarely barks, however, due to their size and loyalty they make an excellent dog for personal protection. They are very sensitive and reflect the moods of those around them.

Care

This is a high maintenance breed that requires daily combing to prevent mats and tangles. Professional trimming is needed four to six times per year. Bathing or dry shampooing should be done when necessary. It is important to clean and check the eyes and ears on a consistent basis. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is prone to flea allergies, Addison’s disease, PLN, and PLE. They do not do well in hot climates.

Coat

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier’s coat is this breeds’ most distinguishing feature. It is medium long, abundant, soft, silky, and slightly wavy. Although they are a single coat breed, their hair continuously grows and provides insulation and protection. Puppies are born black, but at maturation the coat ranges from gold to reddish-gold to silver. This breed is low shedding.

Training

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is typically independent and stubborn and requires a dominant owner. However, they are quick to learn and eager to please. Early socialization and basic obedience is recommended. Due to their sensitive nature they do not respond to harsh or heavy-handed training methods. They do best with patience, praise, consistency, firmness, and fairness. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier excels in agility and fly-ball competition and is used with great success as a therapy dog.

Activity

Athletic and energetic, the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier enjoys many family activities such as hiking, play sessions, and walks. A securely fenced yard where they can romp and run is ideal. They will do well in an apartment or condominium dwelling provided they are sufficiently exercised and receive an appropriate amount of attention and stimulation.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100274/

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Silky Terrier

Overview

The Silky Terrier is intelligent, curious, and in constant motion. Originally developed in the 19th century in Australia. The Silky is compact but is light in build. They are a friendly and spirited breed. The Silky Terrier can be possessive with their family and property.

Character

The Silky Terrier is an excellent companion. This breed has a keen alertness and a true Terrier nature. They can, on occasion, exhibit defiance and stubbornness. They do not like to be left alone for extended periods of time and do best when someone is home for most of the day. The Silky makes an excellent watchdog.

Temperament

The Silky Terrier is generally happy and loves to play. They are bold in action and have a mischievous streak. This breed loves to dig and bark. The Silky is most suited for older, well-behaved children. They are extremely territorial and may exhibit aggression toward other dogs. They love to chase cats, so raising them with cats from puppy-hood is highly recommended.

Care

The Silky Terrier’s coat is highly susceptible to tangles and matting. They require daily brushing and combing. This breed requires a deep commitment from their owners. To keep the coat lustrous regular shampooing is necessary. The Silky is prone to several disorders including luxating patella, tracheal collapse, and epilepsy.

Coat

The Silky Terrier’s coat is virtually non-shedding and odorless. Their coat is one of the breed’s most prominent features. It is straight, silky, and shiny. Unlike the Yorkie, whose coat flows to the floor, the Silky coat is shorter and conforms to the shape of the body. The texture is much like human hair. The color of the coat may be blue and red, or blue and tan.

Training

This breed may be difficult to housebreak. They respond best to praise, reward, love and consistency. The Silky Terrier does well in obedience training provided the method used is not done using a choke collar. The Silky trachea is easily damaged. Training must be done firmly and fairly.

Activity

The Silky Terrier is a bundle of energy. They love to be given chances to run and play, but must have a tightly fenced yard. They also enjoy brisk walks and playing ball. The Silky is able to do well in an apartment, although they are also an active indoor breed. It is important they are kept busy and social to discourage boredom.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100251/

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Siberian Husky

Overview

The Siberian Husky originated in northeastern Siberia as an endurance sled dog. In 1909 large numbers of this breed arrived in Alaska to participate in sled racing. The Siberian Husky’s endurance, stamina, and strength quickly made them a popular breed in the Arctic region.

Character

The Siberian Husky is a compact and strong working dog. They are able to withstand temperatures as low as 75 degrees below zero, so are best suited for cooler to cold climates. They display a measure of dignity and reserve. The Siberian Husky is an amiable companion and willing worker.

Temperament

The Siberian Husky has an affectionate, gentle, and friendly disposition. They are alert and eager to please. They are highly intelligent and have an independent spirit, which can sometimes be a challenge to their owner. This versatile breed gets along very well with children and other medium sized dogs. However, their strong predatory instinct makes them dangerous to cats and other small pets. The Siberian Husky thrives in a family environment but does not become overly attached to one specific person. They will exhibit no fear or suspicion of strangers. They are not well suited for a two career family and require attention and companionship. They prefer to live in packs.

Care

The Siberian Husky is by nature clean and free from body odor. They require daily brushing to minimize excess loose hair, tangles, and mats. Bathing should only be done when absolutely necessary with a mild shampoo. The Siberian Husky is prone to hip dysplasia, cataracts, and skin allergies. It is extremely vital that they do not become overheated.

Coat

The Siberian Husky has a medium length double coat. The under coat is dense and soft in texture. The outer coat is longer and coarse with straight guard hairs. Their coat comes in a variety of colors and patterns. The most common colors are black and white, gray and white, copper red and white, and pure white. The facial markings include masks and spectacles. The Siberian Husky is a constant shedder that totally sheds the undercoat twice a year.

Training

The Siberian Husky is highly intelligent but has a mind of its own. They will only obey a command if they see the point of it. They respond best to patience, consistency, and fairness. They will quickly take advantage of an owner that doesn’t let them know who the boss is. They may be difficult to housebreak. The crate training method is recommended. They will do well with early obedience training.

Activity

The Siberian Husky has an innate and deep desire to run. They do best with a large securely fenced yard. If they are left alone for extended periods of time they will become bored which leads to digging and destruction. They make excellent walking and jogging companions provided they are very securely leashed and the climate is not too hot. The Husky is not recommended for apartment dwelling unless they are exceedingly well trained and sufficiently exercised.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100250/

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Shiba Inu

Overview

A very bold, lively and sweet dog, the Shiba Inu has won the hearts of many and has grown in popularity. This breed makes a good companion and does very well with children. Somewhat wary of strangers, but warms up quickly.

Character

This agile breed is playful and energetic. Lively, charming, and affectionate, this breed can also be independent while demanding attention from his master. The Shiba Inu should not be kept around small animals but can do well with cats.

Temperament

The Shiba Inu is intelligent, alert, and makes a good alarm dog at times. This breed can be prone to barking. This breed can prove to be a handful if not handled by an experienced owner as they tend to be willful.

Care

The Shiba Inu has a coat that is fairly easy to groom. Rubber brushing does well with the coat of this dog to remove dead and loose hair. Seasonally a heavy shedder, many owners rely on regular professional grooming to keep shedding to a minimum. Do not bathe this dog regularly as it will remove the waterproofing this breed retains.

Coat

The Shiba Inu has a thick double coat. Outercoat should remain stiff and straight. The undercoat should be soft and thick. This breed has bushy hair on its tail and its hind legs.

Training

This intelligent dog is pretty easy to housebreak, but obedience training should start at a young age. Being that this dog is high energy, they require a firm handler, and can be stubborn at times.

Activity

The Shiba Inu is not recommended for kennel life and should be kept as a member of the family as he loves attention. An average sized yard would suit this dog well; however regular walks can be sufficient.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100247/

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Shetland Sheepdog – Sheltie

Overview

Resembling a Miniature Collie, this breed is an absolute delight to own. Intelligent, sweet, gentle, making this dog a great companion animal. Throughout the years, this breed has become very popular and is said to have almost a human like intelligence. Sometimes wary of strangers, the Sheltie also loves to bark persistently.

Character

A sweet disposition, this loveable breed does have a very strong herding instinct often nipping at ankles and chasing cars. This is a home breed and should not be kept in a kennel like environment. The Shetland Sheepdog is very affectionate and lovely, yet can be protective of his owner and/or territory. This dog loves being an in-home companion and would gladly lie down on the couch next to his family.

Temperament

High energy, active, very trainable, this breed has a well-rounded and even temperament giving him the idealistics for a household pet. The Shetland Sheepdog does well with children, but children should be properly trained to handle a dog of any breed. Used as a watch dog, this gentle breed will not attack without being repeatedly provoked so does not do well for guarding. Great for herding, this dog is still commonly used for herding purposes in a country environment and does exceptionally well.

Care

Regular brushing is necessary to keep the coat smooth and free of tangles. The long coat of the Sheltie does tend to trap dirt so supervision is necessary unless regular bathing is not a problem. Heavily shedding during certain seasons, the hair can become a mess so grooming is particularly important during this stage.

Coat

The Shetland Sheepdog, better known as the Sheltie has a long double coat, sporting a frill around the neck area. The coat of the Sheltie needs extensive grooming on a regular basis.

Training

The Sheltie is very easy to train and does very well in obedience and herding given the right methods and trainer. Having a human like intelligence, Shetland Sheepdogs are willing to obey, and very eager to do so. Does very well in working environments being that the herding instinct is still very strong.

Activity

This high-energy breed should have regular exercise. Most prefer to allow their Shelties to run free but must be in a fenced in yard, as this breed loves to chase things and will surely bolt if given the opportunity and visual stimulation. An average sized yard would be ideal for this small yet lively breed.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100246/

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Scottish Terrier

Overview

The Scottish Terrier originated in Scotland and is considered to be the most ancient of any Highland Terrier. They are curious and playful, small and muscular. The Scottie makes a good companion for the right family. They have a compact and sturdy build.

Character

The Scottish Terrier exudes a bold and dignified manner. They do not give their love and devotion freely. This breed will typically watch their surroundings and those around them before making any decisions regarding them. The Scottie is extremely smart and independent.

Temperament

The Scottish Terrier will go anywhere and do anything. They have a dominant personality and a tendency to be territorial. The Scottie may show aggression to other dogs and cats if they are not socialized properly at an early age. They are good watchdogs and will not bark without good reason. They are not tolerant of unruly and rambunctious young children.

Care

The Scottish Terrier requires brushing twice weekly to keep the coat tangle free. They do require grooming and trimming to keep their distinctive look. The Scottie is highly prone to cancer of the bladder. They also may suffer from cataracts, hypothyroidism, and Von Willebrand Disease. This breed is especially sensitive to fleas and many have skin problems.

Coat

The Scottish Terrier’s coat is coarse with a soft and dense undercoat that provides protection from bad weather. The outer hair coat is hard and wiry and grows to approximately 2 inches in length. This breed is low shedding. The Scottie is most often black in color, but the coat may also be brindle, gray, sandy, and wheaten. They are never white.

Training

The Scottish Terrier does best with very early socialization training to avoid aggression to other dogs’ as they get older. Their strong independence presents a training challenge. The Scottie can be stubborn, so motivation, consistency, and positive praise are a must. They do very well in obedience and agility if the proper training techniques are utilized.

Activity

The Scottish Terrier is always ready for an adventure and activity. They require long walks, stimulation, and play. The Scottie does not do well in extremely warm climates. They love to play ball and derive great pleasure from playing fetch. They do well in apartment living provided they are exercised appropriately. The Scottie will become bored and destructive if they do not receive stimulation and exercise and may dig and bark excessively.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100237/

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Schnoodle

Overview

The Schnoodle is created by the crossing of two breeds: Schnauzer and Poodle. They are commonly referred to as “designer dogs” and are one of the most popular companion crosses.

Character

The ideal Schnoodle should be well-proportioned, squarely-built, and possess a sturdy athletic appearance. They should have a keen, bold, and lively expression.

Temperament

The Schnoodle is affectionate, loving, and devoted. They do best in a home with older, considerate children or children they have been raised with. They do well with dogs or non-canine pets they have been with since puppyhood. Schnoodle’s may not tolerate dogs or children they do not know. They do not do well if ignored or left alone for extended periods of time. Boredom or loneliness will lead to destructive behavior and incessant barking. They are highly suspicious of strangers and make excellent watchdogs.

Care

The Schnoodle requires frequent brushing to prevent matting and tangling and may also require professional clipping. Bathing should be done when necessary. It is important to keep the ears clean to prevent infection. They may be prone to such health issues as PRA, skin disorders, Von Willebrand’s Disease, diabetes, ear infection, epilepsy, and heart disease.

Coat

The coat of the Schnoodle may be wiry and coarse, curly, or a combination of both.

Training

Early socialization and obedience are a must. The Schnoodle may be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. The crate training method works best. They will not respond to harsh or heavy-handed methods. Training must be done with firmness, fairness, patience, and consistency.

Activity

The Schnoodle is highly energetic but will do okay in an apartment provided they are sufficiently exercised and mentally stimulated. Schnoodle’s are adept at learning tricks and enjoy agility, securely leashed walks, and off-lead play in a fenced yard.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100310/

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Samoyed

Overview

The Samoyed proves to be a friendly and gentle breed, warming up to almost anyone. Very easy going, sweet, and beautiful, this breed takes kindly to almost all people. This breed does not do well as a guard or watch dog, however is highly intelligent.

Character

This is a very peaceful breed that tends to be very active. Very loyal, the Samoyed usually favors his master but will be friendly to most people. A very sociable breed, he is not only beautiful but makes a wonderful companion.

Temperament

This dog has the tendency to bark quite a bit, and will alert you when someone is approaching. Does not do well with smaller and more passive animals, but can do well with cats and other dogs. The Samoyed is very friendly and does well with children.

Care

The Samoyed has a very thick coat, which requires much grooming. They shed heavily during warmer seasons and should be regularly brushed. The coat of this dog tends to trap dirt, but with regular brushing it should release easily.

Coat

The Samoyed has a long and thick double coat and requires a lot of grooming. The outercoat should be harsher than the undercoat, but still fairly soft. Undercoat should be short, thick, and should have wool like texture.

Training

This breed can be very willful and stubborn when it comes to obedience training but will do well with firm, consistent, and patient training techniques. Variety is best as Samoyeds can have a low attention span.

Activity

The Samoyed does best in cooler climates, but will do okay in warmer weather. Proper exercise is required as this breed can be lively, but proper water and rests must be given as this breed has a wooly coat.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100229/

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Saint Bernard – St. Bernard

Overview

The Saint Bernard is a very ancient breed that was founded in AD 980. The most popular use of these gentle giants is in the area of search and rescue. The Saint Bernards uncanny ability to sense imminent danger, coupled with their heightened abilities of smell and direction, make this breed a useful and trustworthy worker and companion.

Character

The Saint Bernard is extremely loyal and friendly. They are powerful and muscular but never ill natured. They are faithful, highly intelligent, and unassuming. The Saint Bernard is imposing in size but displays a mellow and benevolent demeanor.

Temperament

The Saint Bernard has a somewhat sorrowful expression, but is actually very good-natured. They are excellent with children and other animals. They have a protective instinct for their family and make excellent watchdogs. They are sensible and loving and make a great family pet. They may display stubbornness, so owners must be very patient. They thrive on high amounts of love and attention. The Saint Bernard is prone to anxiety if left alone for extended periods of time and may destroy their owner’s home and belongings.

Care

The Saint Bernard’s coat is shed twice a year. They require daily brushing with a firm bristle brush to keep hair around the home down to a minimal amount. Bathing should only be done when necessary using a mild shampoo to avoid stripping the coat of its essential oils. Their eyes and ears must be checked and cleaned regularly to keep them free of irritants. The Saint Bernard is prone to such health issues as wobbler syndrome, heart problems, skin disorders, and bloating. They have no tolerance for hot weather.

Coat

The Saint Bernard breed has two different coat varieties: the smooth or shorthaired, and the rough or longhaired. Both varieties of coat are extremely dense in texture and are water resistant. The coat of the Saint Bernard is typically white with tan, red, mahogany, black or brindle markings in various combinations. They are heavy shedders.

Training

The Saint Bernard must be socialized at an early age while they are still a manageable size. They have a strong desire to please their owner and will respond best to gentle, patient, firm, and consistent training. The Saint Bernard does well with elementary exercises and obedience such as heeling, sitting, and staying.

Activity

The Saint Bernard requires a moderate amount of outdoor exercise. It is important they do not become over-heated. They enjoy daily walks and play sessions. They are suitable for apartment living provided they are given frequent walks. They will enjoy a yard of any size but it must be securely fenced.

Source : http://www.nextdaypets.com/directory/breeds/1100227/

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